Mormonism

Mormonism is a pseudo-Christian religion begun in 1830 by Joseph Smith in the New England area. The Mormon church, also known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, denies the historic Trinity (teaching three gods), says salvation is by grace and works (2 Nephi 25:23), and that people have the potential of becoming gods and goddesses. Some of its unique doctrines of the Mormon Church are that God used to be a man on another world who became a God and came to this world with one of his wives. We all are literally born in heaven as spirit brothers and sisters and then inhabit human bodies on earth. For more information on this cult, please see Mormonism on CARM.

Following is a listing of Mormon Teachings cited from Mormon writers.

  • There are many gods, (Mormon Doctrine, p. 163)
  • There is a mother goddess, (Articles of Faith, by James Talmage, p. 443)
  • God used to be a man on another planet, (Mormon Doctrine, p. 321)
  • After you become a good Mormon, you have the potential of becoming a god, (Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, pages 345-347, 354)
  • God resides near a star called Kolob, Pearl of Great Price, pages 34-35; Mormon Doctrine, p. 428.)
  • The Trinity is three separate gods, (James Talmage, Articles of Faith, p. 35)
  • God is increasing in knowledge, (Joseph Smith, Journal of Discourses, Vol. 6, p. 120)
  • God has the form of a man, (Joseph Smith, Journal of Discourses, Vol. 6, p. 3).
  • God the Father has a body of flesh and bones, (Doctrine and Covenants, 130:22)
  • God is married to his goddess wife and has spirit children, (Mormon Doctrine p. 516)
  • We were first begotten as spirit children in heaven and then born naturally on earth, (Journal of Discourse, Vol. 4, p. 218).
  • Jesus and Satan are spirit brothers and we were all born as siblings in heaven to them both, (Mormon Doctrine, p. 163)
  • There is no salvation without accepting Joseph Smith as a prophet of God, (Doctrines of Salvation, Vol. 1, p. 188)
  • There are three levels of heaven: telestial, terrestrial, and celestial, (Mormon Doctrine, p. 348).
  • The Holy Ghost is a male personage, (A Marvelous Work and a Wonder, p 118; Journal of Discources, Vol. 5, page 179)
  • Baptism for the dead, (Doctrines of Salvation, Vol. II, p. 141). This is a practice of baptizing each other in place of non-Mormons who are now dead. Their belief is that in the afterlife, the "newly baptized" person will be able to enter into a higher level of Mormon heaven.

 

 

 

 
 
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